HSA

Industry & Regulatory News
IRS Final Rule on Electronic Filing Requirements at OMB

The Office of Management and Budget has received a final rule from the IRS titled “Electronically Filed Returns”.

The IRS released a proposed rule in July 2021 regarding electronic filing requirements for certain information returns, pursuant to the Taxpayer First Act of 2019. The proposed regulations reduce the threshold by which filers must electronically file from 250 to 100 returns for the 2022 calendar year. For filings required after calendar year 2022, the threshold will be further reduced to 10 returns.

August 17 2022
Industry & Regulatory News
Additional ACA FAQs Released

The Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services and Treasury issued a joint FAQ related to the coverage of contraceptive products as preventive services by group health plans or issuers. The FAQ provides the following:

  • Group health plans and issuers are required to cover items or services that are integral to the furnishing of a recommended preventive service. The FAQ clarifies that coverage of anesthesia for a tubal litigation procedure or pregnancy tests required prior to the provision of an intrauterine device would be considered preventive services.
August 01 2022
Industry & Regulatory News
DOL Proposed Amendment for QPAM Exemptions Has Left OMB

A Proposed Rule titled “Proposed Amendment to PTE 84-14 for Plan Asset Transactions Determined by an Independent Qualified Plan Asset Manager” (QPAM) has left the Office of Management and Budget—suggesting that official release may come soon.

ERISA generally prohibits a number of transactions between a plan and a “party in interest”—including fiduciaries and those providing services to the plan—unless an exemption is granted. PTE 84-14 is a class exemption regarding certain transactions between a party in interest with respect to an employee benefit plan and an investment fund that is managed by a QPAM. An employee benefit plan includes an employee welfare benefit or pension benefit plan, a trust defined under IRC. Secs. 401(a) or 403(a), IRAs, HSAs, MSAs, and ESAs. QPAMs are independent fiduciaries that are a bank, savings and loan, insurance company, or registered investment advisor meeting certain asset/net worth thresholds. 

July 18 2022
Industry & Regulatory News
IRS Posts Draft 2022 Form 8889 for HSA Reporting

The IRS has released a draft 2022 tax year Form 8889, Health Savings Accounts (HSAs). Form 8889 is filed by taxpayers to report HSA contributions and associated tax deductions, HSA distributions, and any tax or penalty tax owed for distributions not used for qualified medical expenses.

July 12 2022
Industry & Regulatory News
2023 HSA Limits Released

May 3, 2022 - The IRS has issued Revenue Procedure 2022-24, providing inflation-adjusted amounts for health savings accounts (HSAs) for calendar year 2023. Maximum annual HSA contributions will rise from $3,650 to $3,850 for those with self-only insurance coverage, and from $7,300 to $7,750 for those with family coverage.

Minimum deductible amounts for qualifying high deductible health plans will increase from $1,400 for self-only coverage to $1,500, and from $2,800 to $3,000 for a family plan. Maximum annual out-of-pocket amounts under self-only coverage will rise from $7,050 to $7,500, and from $14,100 to $15,000 for family coverage.

May 03 2022
Industry & Regulatory News
Health Savings for Seniors Act Reintroduced in House

Representatives Ami Bera (D-CA) and Jason Smith (R-MO) have reintroduced the “Health Savings for Seniors Act” (H.R. 3796) to permit those enrolled in Medicare to contribute to a health savings account (HSA). Pursuant to the Internal Revenue Code (the Code), an individual is eligible to contribute to an HSA if, among other things, the individual is not a participant in Medicare. The Act would amend the Code to remove this restriction if the individual is enrolled in a Medicare plan that has an annual deductible of $1,000 for self-only coverage and $2,000 for family coverage and the annual deductible plus the annual out-of-pocket expenses does not exceed $5,000 for self-only coverage and $10,000 for family coverage. The Act would also amend the Code to prohibit use of HSA funds to pay for Medicare premiums and any Medicare enrollee would be allowed to spend HSA funds only on medical expenses. Currently, individuals with an HSA account are able to spend the HSA contributions for any purpose, including medical expenses, once the individual turns 65, regardless of Medicare enrollment.

April 13 2022
Industry & Regulatory News
House Passes Affordable Insulin Now Act

The House has passed the Affordable Insulin Now Act (the “Act”) to limit the cost of insulin to either $35 or 25 percent of the plan’s negotiated price, whichever is less. Group health plans or health insurance issuers of group or individual insurance would be required to implement the coverage of insulin products beginning January 1, 2023. In addition, the Act caps the cost-sharing limit under Medicare to $35 in 2023, even if the individual has reached the annual out-of-pocket limit and to $35 in 2024 for those who have not yet reached their annual out-of-pocket limit. The legislation must still pass the Senate before it is enacted.

April 05 2022
Industry & Regulatory News
Health Care Equality and Modernization Act Introduced in House

Representative Peter Sessions introduced the Health Care Equality and Modernization Act of 2022 (the “Act”) in the House of Representatives. The Act contains various provisions that would amend the Affordable Care Act (ACA), redefine individual health coverage HRAs (“ICHRAs”), limit premium tax credits, and improve health savings accounts (HSAs).

The Act would repeal the ACA employer mandate and related information reporting, limit consumer protections, and impose a 20 percent penalty assessed as a premium increase for any individual that does not have continuous health insurance coverage for a period of 12 months. The Act would redefine ICHRAs to no longer treat them as group health plans pursuant to the ACA, ERISA, or the IRC. In addition, the Act would not require ICHRAs to comply with various federal laws, including ERISA, the IRC, the ACA, COBRA, and HIPAA. The Act would also limit premium tax credits to those individuals in states that have expanded the Exchange to all areas. Premium tax credits may also be used, at the discretion of the individual, to fund an HSA. Related to HSAs, the Act would increase the individual contribution limit to $5,000 and the family limit based on the number of individuals enrolled in family coverage. Upon the death of the account holder, the Act would also permit for easier transfer by treating the surviving spouse as the named account holder.

April 01 2022
Industry & Regulatory News
House Passes Spending Bill That Would Include Telehealth Extension

The House of Representatives on Wednesday passed a substantial $1.5 Trillion omnibus spending package to fund the government. Included in the bill is a provision that would temporarily allow expenses for telehealth and other remote care services to continue be paid from a health savings account (HSA) without first meeting the deductible under the high deductible health plan (HDHP). The provision would allow the deductible to be disregarded for the period April 1, 2022, through December 31, 2022.

Previously, the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act amended the same provision to temporarily cover telehealth and remote care services without meeting the deductible for the period after January 1, 2020, for plan years beginning on or before December 31, 2021.

While the provision, if enacted, would allow additional temporary flexibility for HSA owners to cover telehealth expenses from their accounts before meeting deductibles, it is important to note that due to the timing of the expiration of the CARES relief and the extension proposed in the legislation, telehealth services for the period January 1, 2022, through March 31, 2022, would be subject to the HDHP deductible requirements before they would be considered a qualified medical expense for HSA purposes.

The bill now heads to the Senate, where a vote is expected by a Friday funding deadline. However, House lawmakers also passed a stopgap measure by voice vote that lasts until Tuesday to ensure that the Senate has enough time to clear the omnibus package without risking a government shutdown.

March 10 2022
Industry & Regulatory News
Legislation Proposed to Expand Qualified Medical Expenses to Include Infant Diapers

Senator Joni Ernst (R-IA) has introduced the Diaper Inclusion in Accounts for Parental Expense Reduction (DIAPER) Act. The bipartisan bill would allow the use of flexible spending accounts (FSAs) and health savings accounts (HSAs) to be used to purchase disposable infant diapers as qualified medical expenses. Any progress of the bill through Congress will be monitored, and details provided as they become available.

February 28 2022